Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Core story

UPDATE; Deceiving the Witch Next Door by Misa Bourbon Ramirez is on sale at amazon for kindle today. I haven't reviewed it, but I have reviewed some of her other books. I read this one and really liked it. Fun read and now only 99 cents.

I started to try and follow JAK's advice and pin down my core story. Having worked on it a while I have come to the conclusion that I'm not ready for that yet. It's murky and covered in fog. I need to write it a few more times before the fog lifts and the murkiness clears.

Here is the rest of what she had to say about it, if you are interested:

"FIND YOUR CORE STORY. Yep, every author has one, regardless of the genre the writer chooses and regardless of what that author believes. Your Core Story has nothing to do with the fictional landscape -- historical, contemporary, paranormal --... or the genre you prefer. It has everything to do with the emotional conflicts that intrigue you. Those are the conflicts from which you will pull your power as a writer for the rest of your career so it pays to identify them early on. Trust me. In case you're stuck thinking you can only write historicals or vampires or contemporary settings or mysteries or suspense or paranormal or, fantasy or, yes, literary fiction, I urge you to step away from the computer and take another look. Your core story doesn't care what backdrop or genre you prefer -- your core story is all about the emotions and internal conflicts and the kinds of characters you like to put on stage -- these are the things that compel you to tell your story." Jayne Ann Krentz on facebook September 10, 2013.

This reminds me of another book - Haroun and the Sea of Stories by Salman Rushdie. In the story the antagonist is trying to plug the source for all stories and Haroun has to stop him. Haroun's father, Rashid, is a story teller.

""Haroun often thought of his father as a Juggler, because his stories were really lots of different tales juggled together, and Rashid kept them going in a sort of dizzy whirl, and never made a mistake.
"Where did all these stories come from? It seemed that all Rashid had to do was to part his lips in a plump red smile and out would pop some brand-new saga, complete with sorcery, love-interest, princesses, wicked uncles, fat aunts, mustachioed gangsters in yellow check pants, heroes, fights, and half a dozen catchy, hummable tunes. 'Everything comes from somewhere,' Haroun reasoned, 'so these stories can't simply come out of thin air...?'"
Salman Rushdie


It's an absolutely enchanting story and if you have an opportunity to listen to the version where Rushdie himself reads it, it's mesmerizing.

Now as to the obligatory question at the end - I'm going a completely different direction:

Do you follow your favorite writers on facebook or twitter?

I do. I like feeling connected to them.

11 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. Yes, I do follow my favorite authors on FB. I don't go on Twitter much these days.

    I like this idea of a core concept. I'm going to think about it a bit, but I think that in part it's about finding one's authentic self, something I've struggled with all my life. IN my current WIP, that's probably the main idea about the main character.

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    1. I enjoy following authors on facebook. I'm a tumblr person over twitter myself.

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  3. I do. I follow so many authors that sometimes I get dizzy. : )
    I enjoyed SEP'S and JK's three secrets of writing and totally understood JAK's core story advice. There is always a thread of injustice in my own stories. And I'm sympathetic to the underdog. Not certain where that came from, but it always seems to creep in.

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  4. I try to -- I like so many that it's hard to keep up with all of them.

    I'm in total agreement with Ms. Krentz about the core story.

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    1. I know one of your core elements is hilarity which I greatly enjoy.

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  5. Some of them I do follow in Twitter. (It DOES help to feel connected, I totally agree.)
    Facebook and I are still not getting along, though.

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    1. In, on, it's only one letter. If you think facebook is hard to get along with - tumblr makes facebook look soooo easy.

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